Big Data, Fast & Slow: Why HP’s Project Moonshot Matters

Cloudline | Blog | Big Data, Fast & Slow: Why HP’s Project Moonshot Matters

In Marz’s presentation, which describes how Twitter’s Storm project complements Hadoop in the company’s analytics efforts, Marz says in essence (and here I’m heavily paraphrasing and expanding) that there are really two types of “Big Data”: fast and slow.

Fast “Big Data” is real-time analytics, where messages are parsed and for some kind of significance as they come in at wire speed. In this type of analytics, you apply a set of pre-developed algorithms and tools to the incoming datastream, looking for events that match certain patterns so that your platform can react in real time. A few examples: Twitter runs real-time analytics on the Twitter firehose in order to identify trending topics; Topsy runs real-time analytics on the same Twitter firehose in order to identify new topics and links that people are discussing, so that it can populate its search index; a high-frequency trader runs real-time analytics on market data in order to identify short-term (often in the millisecond range) market trends so that it can turn a tiny, quick profit.

Real-time analytics workloads are have a few common characteristics, the most important of which is that they are latency sensitive and compute-bound. These workloads are also bandwidth intensive in that the compute part of the platform can process more data than storage and I/O can feed it (hence the compute bottleneck). People doing real-time analytics need lots and lots of CPU horsepower (and even GPU horsepower in the case of HFT), and they keep as much data as they can in RAM so that they’re not bottlenecked by disk I/O.

I’ve drawn a quick and dirty diagram of this process, above. As you can see, the bottlenecks for Hadoop are the disk I/O from the data archive and the human brain’s ability to form hypotheses and turn them into queries. The first bottleneck can be addressed with SSD, while fixing the second is the job of the growing stack of more human-friendly tools that now sits atop Hadoop.

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