“There was no open trial for enemies of the State. It was said it wasn’t necessary; they had forfeited their right to it.”

More from Milton Mayer’s They Thought They Were Free: the Germans 1933-45:

“Very early,” he went on, “still in spring, one of our SA leaders protested against the dismissal of the Oberburgermeister, a Social Democrat, a good, really nonpolitical man. The SA leader was arrested and taken away. And this, mind you, was when the SA still had great power in the regime. He never came back. His family is still here. We heard he was convicted, but we never heard fro what. There was no open trial for enemies of the State. It was said it wasn’t necessary; they had forfeited their right to it.” [emphasis added]

See Romney’s explanation of why he would have signed the National Defense Authorization Act, which enables the US military to abduct US citizens on US soil and imprison them indefinitely without trial; and if they get a trial, it will be in a closed military tribunal, and not in open court.

The logic here, as it is in every totalitarian regime, is that the moment you become an “enemy of the state” you lose your right to demand that the state actually prove that you’re its enemy in open court. We’re just to take the State’s word for it—just trust your government, is the answer. Or, actually, let’s roll the tape and quote Romney from the video above:

Romney: “I recognize that when you’re in a setting where there are enemy combatants, and some of them on our own soil, that could possibly be abused. There are a lot of things that I think this president does wrong—lots of them—but I don’t think he’s gonna abuse this power, and I know that if I were president I would not abuse this power. And I can also tell you that in my view, you have to chose people who you believe have sufficient character not to abuse the power of the presidency and to make sure that we do not violate our constitutional principles.”

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