Intel Responds to Calxeda/HP ARM Server News: Xeon Still Wins for Big Data

Cloudline | Blog | Intel Responds to Calxeda/HP ARM Server News: Xeon Still Wins for Big Data

Intel’s Radek Walcyzk, head of PR for the chipmaker’s server division, called Wired today with Intel’s official response to the ARM-based microserver news from Tuesday. In a nutshell, Intel would like the public to know that the microserver phenomenon is indeed real, and that Intel will own it with Xeon, and to a lesser extent with Atom.

Now, you’re probably thinking, isn’t Xeon the exact opposite of the kind of extreme low-power computing envisioned by HP with Project Moonshot? Surely this is just crazy talk from Intel? Maybe, but Walcyzk raised some valid points that are worth airing.

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If the PC Is Dead, Someone Forgot to Tell Intel’s Customers

Cloudline | Blog | If the PC Is Dead, Someone Forgot to Tell Intel’s Customers.

Another quarter, another fresh set of earnings records for Intel. As has been the case for the past few quarters, the Tuesday release of Intel’s third-quarter earnings shows that revenue is up on both the client and server sides of Intel’s business. As a tech industry bellwether, Intel’s results are always most informative when broken out by vertical, so let’s take a look at what happened this past quarter.

The first take-home from Intel’s quarterly results is that the rumors of the PC’s demise have been greatly exaggerated. Intel’s PC Client Group revenue is up 22 percent year-over-year, a healthy jump that (not coincidentally) echoes the 26 percent year-over-year jump that Apple’s most recent quarterly results saw in Mac sales. The one segment of the PC market that “post-PC” pundits have been right about are netbooks—Atom sales are down a whopping 24 percent sequentially and 32 percent year-over-year. To once again take a sideways glance at Apple’s earnings, the iPad is up 166 percent year-over-year in units shipped, so it seems likely that any tablet cannibalization of the PC is confined to the netbook segment (which consumers have hated for a long time anyway).

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